New Statesman 1989

Front page | Back to Journalism

AIDS: the race against time?

"Early intervention" in Britain could save up to 50,000 lives and £20 billion. The trouble is that the government has put scarcely a penny into the necessary research.

6 January, 1989

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The drugs log-jam

Duncan Campbell explains how new experimental drugs can slow down the onslaught of Aids.

27 January, 1989

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Letters

A letter from a New Statesman reader in response to Campbell's investigation into Aids.

3 February, 1989

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Sharp practice

Duncan Campbell and BBC Watchdog reveals how dying patients in one of London's largest private hospitals were experimented on by an unscrupulous clinic profitting from the diseased.

7 April, 1989

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Let them eat shit

When orthodox medicine fails, the alternative drug sales force can move in and make a killing. Duncan Campbell and Nigel Townson expose a fraudster who's profiteering by selling extracts of excrement to sick and dying people.

16 June, 1989

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Pretty poison

Duncan Campbell and Nigel
Townson report on the boom in organic germanium, "a nutritionally valueless poison, sold for huge profits.

8 September, 1989

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Carry on spying - and dying?

MI5 documents leaked to the the IRA is the biggest security disaster in the 20-year war with the Provos.

20 October, 1989

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Spy in the sky

Zircon, the controversial British spy satellite, may now be spying on the Soviet Union.

22 December, 1989

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